Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee

Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee
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Frequently Asked Questions

 

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Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee

 

 


Does Rotary International pay for the float?

How are the contributions used?

Why do we enter a float in the Rose Parade?

Where can I get information about the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game?

Can I see the float during decoration?

Can I help decorate the float?

How are floats selected for entry into the Rose Parade?

When did the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee first enter a float in the Rose Parade?

How many people will see the float?

How can I contact the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee?

Does Rotary International pay for the float

Rotarians, Clubs and Districts in the United States and Canada donate all of the money to pay for the float. 

How are the contributions used?

Approximately ninety-three percent of the money raised goes to costs directly into building, decorating and entering the float in the parade. The balance of the funds raised pay for business, banking, insurance and other miscellaneous costs related to the float and hosting the RI President while attending the parade and other related activities. None of the money raised for float construction is spent on professional staff or committee perks.

Why do we enter a float in the Rose Parade?

Paul Harris said, "In the promotion of Rotary, it is important to reach large numbers and you cannot reach them privately."

When Rotary International's directors approved the first entry in the parade over 34 years ago, they saw in it an unrivaled opportunity to bring Rotary's name into public view. They reasoned that an eye-catching float would capture the interest of network commentators and remind the world, of Rotary's good works. And so it has!

Last year the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee had a viewing audience; over 39 million in the United States and millions around the world in more than 220 territories. The Tournament estimates that more than 700,000 are present live on the parade route 100,000 view the floats as they are decorated and approximately 60,000 view the post-parade floats.

For the 35th consecutive year the Committee again proudly presents its float to North America and the world . And each year, more clubs enthusiastically contribute financial support to this most important Rotary public relations project.

Where can I get information about the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game?

Visit the Tournament of Roses website: www.tournamentofroses.com 

Can I see the float during decoration?

See the Viewing the Float page for information.   Each year, over 100,000 people view the float under construction.

Can I help decorate the float

Yes. See the Decoration Schedule and Signup pages on this website. You will be able to volunteer on-line to decorate the float starting September 10 of each year. Appproximately 800 Rotary Family Volunteers help prepare and/or apply the organic materials to the float.

How are floats selected for entry into the Rose Parade

The Tournament of Roses selects applications for Rose Parade Floats carefully. There are about 60 floats in the Tournament of Roses Parade each year. Floats are sponsored by municipalities, community volunteer organizations and commercial sector.

We are fortunate to be to appear in the parade and are very proud to be a part of the prestigious Tournament of Roses New Year's Day Parade.

When did the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee first enter a float in the Rose Parade

While watching the 1979 Pasadena Rose Parade on Television, Jack Gilbert, who was President of the Wilshire Rotary Club, in Los Angeles, California, and subsequently chairman of the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee, had an idea. Rotary would be celebrating its 75th Anniversary in 1980. Jack believed that by entering a float in the 1980 New Year's Day Rose Parade, Rotary could communicate its message, "Service Above Self" to millions of people worldwide.

Jack shared his vision with other Rotarians, who supported the idea. Seven Governors in Southern California agreed to underwrite the cost of the float and make up any shortfall not covered by Club contributions. Fortunately, the Clubs contributed $35,000 which covered the full cost of the original float.

This first Tournament of Roses experience lead to the formation of the Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee which now receives contributions each year from approximately 8 Rotary Districts and an additional 700 Individual Rotary Clubs to fund the float. The Committee has entered a float every year since 1980. See the History page for pictures and descriptions of previous floats.

How many people will see the float?

Over 300 million people see the Rose Parade New Year's Day.

The Rose Parade is seen by an estimated U.S. audience of 39 million people and an estimated international audience of millions more in over 220 territories. The Pasadena Police Department estimates that approximately 700,000 spectators view the Rose Parade in person. Another 160,000 visit the Parade Float Decorating Sites and/or the Post Parade Float Viewing Area where the floats are on display for two days.

See the Viewing the Float and Parade page for additional information about viewing the float being decorated, in person on January 1 and on television

How can I contact the Rotary Float Committee?

Rotary Rose Parade Float Committee, Inc.
P.O. Box 92502
Pasadena, CA 91109-2502
chair@rotaryfloat.org

 

The Rotary Rose Parade Float is not an official Rotary International program.